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Exams

Our centers offer a comprehensive list of advanced screening and diagnostic imaging exams to fit your medical needs.

3D mammography tomosynthesis is an advanced form of mammography that uses low-dose x-rays to form three-dimensional images of the breasts creating more images compared to a traditional mammogram, which is two-dimensional. 3D mammography can help aid in detecting cancer earlier and is a useful tool for patients with dense breast tissue that can otherwise be difficult to view with a regular mammogram. This exam usually takes a few minutes longer and may require an additional fee.
Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging exam used to obtain images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue, and blood vessels using x-rays to create a 3D image. This exam is most often used as a tool to diagnose the cause of unexplained abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel and colon.
Amyloid PET/CT uses small amounts of radioactive material or radiotracers to reveal how tissues and organs are functioning. It involves injecting a chemical tracer that travels to the brain and sticks to amyloid plaques present. This exam can detect Alzheimer’s brain plaques.
Axumin® (fluciclovine F 18) is an injectable imaging tracer designated for PET/CT imaging. It is used to produce images of the body and its internal organs and tissues. It is specifically used for imaging in men with suspected prostate cancer recurrence based on elevated blood prostate specific antigen levels following prior treatment.
DEXA scan or dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is a non-invasive exam to measure bone loss. It uses a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce two x-ray beams that take pictures of inside the body. This exam is used to detect osteoporosis.
Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), is used specifically in traumatic brain injuries (TBI) for detecting microscopic white matter damage and trace specific tracts of the brain. DTI is a type of MRI that makes it possible to characterize these brain abnormalities especially when used in conjunction with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). SWI is useful for measuring micro-hemorrhages, particularly gray-white matter junctions, that are not detectable on standard MRI.
Neuroquant Brain MRI is a specialized software used in conjunction with MRI to measure the volume of brain structures commonly damaged by Alzheimer’s Disease. This helps to identify, assess, quantify, and monitor neurodegeneration or atrophy in its earliest stages. It has also improved the early detection and treatment of dementia, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy.
Breast biopsy is when cells are removed from a suspicious area in the breast and then examined to determine whether it is benign or cancerous. An MRI guided breast biopsy is minimally invasive without exposure to radiation and performed by a radiologist with the help of MR images. The radiologist uses the MR images to measure and determine the position of the lesion in order to insert the needle that will remove the suspicious tissue.
Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography to help a radiologist remove suspicious breast tissue. It is very helpful in evaluating masses that are not visible on ultrasound. The mammography machine uses low-dose x-rays to produce images of the breast and show the exact position of the suspicious area where the radiologist will insert the needle.
Ultrasound guided breast biopsy uses sound waves to locate a breast abnormality for the radiologist to remove. The radiologist will locate the breast lesion by using the ultrasound probe that allows to follow the motion of the needle and insert the needle directly into the suspicious area in order to remove the tissues.
Breast MRI is noninvasive exam that uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to produce detailed images of the breasts. A breast MRI is used with mammography, rather than as a replacement for mammography, to assess breast abnormalities or breast implants as well as screen women at high risk for breast cancer.
Breast ultrasound uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the breasts and shows the structure and movement as wells as the blood flowing through blood vessels. It is mainly used to diagnose breast abnormalities found during a mammogram.
Coronary artery calcium scoring uses a CT scanner to take images of the regions of the heart and the coronary arteries. This scan enables us to determine the amount of calcification in the coronary arteries and allows for a precise quantification of the extent of atherosclerotic plaque build-up.
Cardiac MRI uses radio waves, magnets and a computer to create detailed pictures of the heart. It is used to evaluate cardiac function and the heart’s anatomy as well as detect or monitor heart disease. Cardiac MRI allows for extremely accurate quantification of flow volumes and of flow velocities, even in obese patients without the risks of exposure to ionizing radiation.
CT of the chest is a diagnostic imaging exam used to obtain images of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, ribs and spine using x-rays to create a 3D image. This exam is most often used as a tool to diagnose the cause of the cause of shortness of breath, chest pain, unexplained cough, and other chest symptoms. It can be used to examine abnormalities found on chest x-rays.
Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed information of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels, and is particularly superior for imaging the chest, abdomen and pelvis. A CT scan provides cross-sectional images of the body which are called slices.
Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is an exam that uses x-rays to visualize blood flow in arterial vessels throughout the body, from arteries serving the brain to those providing blood to the lungs, kidneys, and arms and legs. CT combines the use of x-rays with computerized analysis of the images.
Low-dose computed tomography scanning of the chest is an exam for those who have a high risk of developing lung cancer, but do not have symptoms. Low-dose CT lung screening uses less ionizing radiation than a chest CT exam, while producing images of sufficient quality to detect many abnormalities. In order to get a lung screening exam done there are certain criteria that need to be met. You need to be 55-77 years, asymptomatic, current smoker or quit smoking within the last 15 years, and have a tobacco smoking history of at least 30 pack years.
A myelogram is a diagnostic imaging exam that uses contrast dye and computed tomography (CT) to look for problems in the spinal canal. By injecting contrast material into the spine, doctors can visualize the spinal cord, nerves, and tissues that line the nerves (meninges). Myelography is typically used to evaluate the spine before and after surgery and to detect problems in patients who cannot undergo MRI.
Mammography is a low-energy x-ray of the breast taken to detect breast disease. A mammogram can detect breast cancer up to two years before it can be felt. Mammography has been proven to detect cancer earlier than physical exam alone.
An x-ray or radiograph is a medical exam that helps diagnose medical conditions by taking images by using radio waves that pass through the body. A digital x-ray immediately transfers the images captured to a computer system.
A Dotatate is an injectable imaging tracer designated for PET/CT imaging. It is used to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), which can occur throughout the body. Dotatate attaches to these tumors and shows up on the PET/CT image as bright spots.
Echocardiogram or “echo” is an ultrasound of the heart which utilizes sound waves to examine the shape, motion and blood flow of the heart. The physician uses the images and sounds to detect damage and disease of the heart.
An EKG or electrocardiogram records the electrical signals in the heart to determine heart rate, heart rhythm and other information regarding the heart's condition. During this exam, electrodes are placed on the chest that to record the heart's electrical signals, which are then shown as waves on an attached computer monitor or printer.
Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in conjunction with PET/CT to detect metabolically active malignant lesions including lung cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, brain cancer and multiple myeloma. These cancers show up on the PET/CT image as bright spots.
CT of the head is diagnostic imaging exam used to obtain images of inside of the head using x-rays to create a 3D image. It is used to evaluate head injuries, severe headaches, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke, and brain tumors.
MRI is a noninvasive exam that uses a powerful magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to produce detailed images of the organs and tissues in the body. It does not use ionizing radiation. It is used to help diagnose an injury or disease and is very useful for looking at soft tissues and the nervous system.
Magnetic resonance angiography utilizes MRI technology to visualize detailed images of the blood vessels supplying the kidneys/lungs/legs, carotid arteries, intracranial arteries, and aorta. MR Angiography can be extremely successful in screening patients who have a strong family history of arterial aneurysm.
Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non-invasive medical imaging technique that measures the mechanical properties (liver stiffness) of soft tissues by introducing shear waves and imaging their propagation using MRI. It assesses liver fibrosis for patients diagnosed with steatohepatitis/chronic fatty liver and Hepatitis B and C. Unlike liver biopsy, ultrasound or fibroscan, which assess only a tiny sample of the liver, MR elastography assesses the entire liver.
An arthrogram uses MR imaging to evaluate joints like the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee or ankle. During MRI arthrogram, contrast material is injected into the joint, which will outline the structures within the joint in MR images.
An MRI guided breast biopsy is minimally invasive without exposure to radiation and performed by a radiologist with the help of MR images of the breast abnormality. The radiologist uses the MR images to measure and determine the position of the lesion in order to insert the needle that will remove the suspicious tissue.
Prostate MRI uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to create detailed images of the prostate. It is used to assess prostate cancer and determine if it is limited to the prostate. It gives information on how water molecules and blood flow through the prostate.
Nuclear medicine imaging is a specialized area of radiology that uses small amounts of radioactive materials that are injected into the bloodstream, inhaled, or swallowed to examine organ function and structure. Nuclear medicine exams can identify disease in its earliest stages because they have the ability to locate molecular activity. It provides unique information that is used to help diagnose certain diseases like hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, lymphomas, and bone pain from some types of cancer.
Extremity open MRI offers a complete range of high-quality imaging capabilities of the extremities such as hands, feet, wrists, elbows, knees, and ankles. During the exam, the patient is able to comfortably lie back and relax on a padded open couch while placing only their arm or leg into the MRI opening, allowing patients to feel at ease.
An open MRI unit is open on the sides that is great for larger patients or those who are claustrophobic. Since the magnet does not completely surround the patient, they can provide high quality images for some exams, but not all exams can be performed on an open MRI.
Weight-bearing open MRI uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to create detailed images of the cervical and lumbar spines, shoulders, and knees. The position of the patient becomes an integral part of the outcome of the examination, while providing great patient comfort. Gravity generates bio-mechanical changes in anatomy, therefore MRI imaging in a natural, stand-up position obtains important details compared to traditional MRI.
Positron emission tomography - Computed tomography (PET/CT) A PET/CT is a type of nuclear medicine imaging that combines the two non-invasive exams, PET and CT into one single scan. PET uses small amounts of radioactive material or radiotracers to measure important body functions and CT produces multiple images of inside of the body. The result is an accurate exam that will locate and identify abnormal metabolic activity.
Positron emission tomography (PET) uses small amounts of radioactive material or radiotracers to reveal how tissues and organs are functioning. It can identify disease in its earliest stages because they have the ability to locate molecular activity.
Sodium fluoride PET/CT has higher sensitivity and specificity in detecting and diagnosing bone diseases. The primary clinical use of sodium fluoride PET/CT is in the detection of prostate cancer metastasis. It is also used to detect metastatic bone disease and for evaluation of treatment response.
A nuclear stress test involves injecting radioactive dye into the bloodstream when maximum level of exercise is reached, while also taking images of the heart. This exam shows areas with poor blood flow or damage in your heart.
Also called an exercise stress test, a routine stress test is used to measure the heart’s tolerance for exercise and detect different forms of heart disease. This exam involves walking on a treadmill while using an electrocardiogram (EKG) to measure the heart’s activity at rest and while walking. This exam will help learn if there is adequate blood flow to the heart when the heart is stressed.
Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the thyroid gland that is located in the front of the neck. Images are captured in real-time and are used to asses any thyroid nodules.
Transvaginal ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create detailed images of the internal organs in a female’s pelvic area. With this ultrasound, the transducer is inserted into the vagina in order to examine female reproductive organs.
Vascular ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the arteries and veins to assess blood circulation and detect blood clots.
MRI is a noninvasive exam that uses a powerful magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to produce detailed images of the organs and tissues in the body. It does not use ionizing radiation. It is used to help diagnose an injury or disease and is very useful for looking at soft tissues and the nervous system.
Magnetic resonance angiography utilizes MRI technology to visualize detailed images of the blood vessels supplying the kidneys/lungs/legs, carotid arteries, intracranial arteries, and aorta. MR Angiography can be extremely successful in screening patients who have a strong family history of arterial aneurysm.
An arthrogram uses MR imaging to evaluate joints like the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee or ankle. During MRI arthrogram, contrast material is injected into the joint, which will outline the structures within the joint in MR images.
Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), is used specifically in traumatic brain injuries (TBI) for detecting microscopic white matter damage and trace specific tracts of the brain. DTI is a type of MRI that makes it possible to characterize these brain abnormalities especially when used in conjunction with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). SWI is useful for measuring micro-hemorrhages, particularly gray-white matter junctions, that are not detectable on standard MRI.
Neuroquant Brain MRI is a specialized software used in conjunction with MRI to measure the volume of brain structures commonly damaged by Alzheimer’s Disease. This helps to identify, assess, quantify, and monitor neurodegeneration or atrophy in its earliest stages. It has also improved the early detection and treatment of dementia, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy.
Breast MRI is noninvasive exam that uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to produce detailed images of the breasts. A breast MRI is used with mammography, rather than as a replacement for mammography, to assess breast abnormalities or breast implants as well as screen women at high risk for breast cancer.
Cardiac MRI uses radio waves, magnets and a computer to create detailed pictures of the heart. It is used to evaluate cardiac function and the heart’s anatomy as well as detect or monitor heart disease. Cardiac MRI allows for extremely accurate quantification of flow volumes and of flow velocities, even in obese patients without the risks of exposure to ionizing radiation.
Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non-invasive medical imaging technique that measures the mechanical properties (liver stiffness) of soft tissues by introducing shear waves and imaging their propagation using MRI. It assesses liver fibrosis for patients diagnosed with steatohepatitis/chronic fatty liver and Hepatitis B and C. Unlike liver biopsy, ultrasound or fibroscan, which assess only a tiny sample of the liver, MR elastography assesses the entire liver.
An MRI guided breast biopsy is minimally invasive without exposure to radiation and performed by a radiologist with the help of MR images of the breast abnormality. The radiologist uses the MR images to measure and determine the position of the lesion in order to insert the needle that will remove the suspicious tissue.
Prostate MRI uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to create detailed images of the prostate. It is used to assess prostate cancer and determine if it is limited to the prostate. It gives information on how water molecules and blood flow through the prostate.
An open MRI unit is open on the sides that is great for larger patients or those who are claustrophobic. Since the magnet does not completely surround the patient, they can provide high quality images for some exams, but not all exams can be performed on an open MRI.
Extremity open MRI offers a complete range of high-quality imaging capabilities of the extremities such as hands, feet, wrists, elbows, knees, and ankles. During the exam, the patient is able to comfortably lie back and relax on a padded open couch while placing only their arm or leg into the MRI opening, allowing patients to feel at ease.
Weight-bearing open MRI uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to create detailed images of the cervical and lumbar spines, shoulders, and knees. The position of the patient becomes an integral part of the outcome of the examination, while providing great patient comfort. Gravity generates bio-mechanical changes in anatomy, therefore MRI imaging in a natural, stand-up position obtains important details compared to traditional MRI.
DEXA scan or dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is a non-invasive exam to measure bone loss. It uses a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce two x-ray beams that take pictures of inside the body. This exam is used to detect osteoporosis.
Coronary artery calcium scoring uses a CT scanner to take images of the regions of the heart and the coronary arteries. This scan enables us to determine the amount of calcification in the coronary arteries and allows for a precise quantification of the extent of atherosclerotic plaque build-up.
Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed information of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels, and is particularly superior for imaging the chest, abdomen and pelvis. A CT scan provides cross-sectional images of the body which are called slices.
Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is an exam that uses x-rays to visualize blood flow in arterial vessels throughout the body, from arteries serving the brain to those providing blood to the lungs, kidneys, and arms and legs. CT combines the use of x-rays with computerized analysis of the images.
Low-dose computed tomography scanning of the chest is an exam for those who have a high risk of developing lung cancer, but do not have symptoms. Low-dose CT lung screening uses less ionizing radiation than a chest CT exam, while producing images of sufficient quality to detect many abnormalities. In order to get a lung screening exam done there are certain criteria that need to be met. You need to be 55-77 years, asymptomatic, current smoker or quit smoking within the last 15 years, and have a tobacco smoking history of at least 30 pack years.
A myelogram is a diagnostic imaging exam that uses contrast dye and computed tomography (CT) to look for problems in the spinal canal. By injecting contrast material into the spine, doctors can visualize the spinal cord, nerves, and tissues that line the nerves (meninges). Myelography is typically used to evaluate the spine before and after surgery and to detect problems in patients who cannot undergo MRI.
Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging exam used to obtain images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue, and blood vessels using x-rays to create a 3D image. This exam is most often used as a tool to diagnose the cause of unexplained abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel and colon.
CT of the chest is a diagnostic imaging exam used to obtain images of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, ribs and spine using x-rays to create a 3D image. This exam is most often used as a tool to diagnose the cause of the cause of shortness of breath, chest pain, unexplained cough, and other chest symptoms. It can be used to examine abnormalities found on chest x-rays.
CT of the head is diagnostic imaging exam used to obtain images of inside of the head using x-rays to create a 3D image. It is used to evaluate head injuries, severe headaches, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke, and brain tumors.
Positron emission tomography (PET) uses small amounts of radioactive material or radiotracers to reveal how tissues and organs are functioning. It can identify disease in its earliest stages because they have the ability to locate molecular activity.
Positron emission tomography - Computed tomography (PET/CT) A PET/CT is a type of nuclear medicine imaging that combines the two non-invasive exams, PET and CT into one single scan. PET uses small amounts of radioactive material or radiotracers to measure important body functions and CT produces multiple images of inside of the body. The result is an accurate exam that will locate and identify abnormal metabolic activity.
Amyloid PET/CT uses small amounts of radioactive material or radiotracers to reveal how tissues and organs are functioning. It involves injecting a chemical tracer that travels to the brain and sticks to amyloid plaques present. This exam can detect Alzheimer’s brain plaques.
Axumin® (fluciclovine F 18) is an injectable imaging tracer designated for PET/CT imaging. It is used to produce images of the body and its internal organs and tissues. It is specifically used for imaging in men with suspected prostate cancer recurrence based on elevated blood prostate specific antigen levels following prior treatment.
A Dotatate is an injectable imaging tracer designated for PET/CT imaging. It is used to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), which can occur throughout the body. Dotatate attaches to these tumors and shows up on the PET/CT image as bright spots.
Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in conjunction with PET/CT to detect metabolically active malignant lesions including lung cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, brain cancer and multiple myeloma. These cancers show up on the PET/CT image as bright spots.
Sodium fluoride PET/CT has higher sensitivity and specificity in detecting and diagnosing bone diseases. The primary clinical use of sodium fluoride PET/CT is in the detection of prostate cancer metastasis. It is also used to detect metastatic bone disease and for evaluation of treatment response.
DEXA scan or dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is a non-invasive exam to measure bone loss. It uses a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce two x-ray beams that take pictures of inside the body. This exam is used to detect osteoporosis.
An x-ray or radiograph is a medical exam that helps diagnose medical conditions by taking images by using radio waves that pass through the body. A digital x-ray immediately transfers the images captured to a computer system.
Breast biopsy is when cells are removed from a suspicious area in the breast and then examined to determine whether it is benign or cancerous. An MRI guided breast biopsy is minimally invasive without exposure to radiation and performed by a radiologist with the help of MR images. The radiologist uses the MR images to measure and determine the position of the lesion in order to insert the needle that will remove the suspicious tissue.
Breast ultrasound uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the breasts and shows the structure and movement as wells as the blood flowing through blood vessels. It is mainly used to diagnose breast abnormalities found during a mammogram.
Echocardiogram or “echo” is an ultrasound of the heart which utilizes sound waves to examine the shape, motion and blood flow of the heart. The physician uses the images and sounds to detect damage and disease of the heart.
Transvaginal ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create detailed images of the internal organs in a female’s pelvic area. With this ultrasound, the transducer is inserted into the vagina in order to examine female reproductive organs.
Vascular ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the arteries and veins to assess blood circulation and detect blood clots.
An EKG or electrocardiogram records the electrical signals in the heart to determine heart rate, heart rhythm and other information regarding the heart's condition. During this exam, electrodes are placed on the chest that to record the heart's electrical signals, which are then shown as waves on an attached computer monitor or printer.
Nuclear medicine imaging is a specialized area of radiology that uses small amounts of radioactive materials that are injected into the bloodstream, inhaled, or swallowed to examine organ function and structure. Nuclear medicine exams can identify disease in its earliest stages because they have the ability to locate molecular activity. It provides unique information that is used to help diagnose certain diseases like hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, lymphomas, and bone pain from some types of cancer.
A nuclear stress test involves injecting radioactive dye into the bloodstream when maximum level of exercise is reached, while also taking images of the heart. This exam shows areas with poor blood flow or damage in your heart.
Also called an exercise stress test, a routine stress test is used to measure the heart’s tolerance for exercise and detect different forms of heart disease. This exam involves walking on a treadmill while using an electrocardiogram (EKG) to measure the heart’s activity at rest and while walking. This exam will help learn if there is adequate blood flow to the heart when the heart is stressed.
Mammography is a low-energy x-ray of the breast taken to detect breast disease. A mammogram can detect breast cancer up to two years before it can be felt. Mammography has been proven to detect cancer earlier than physical exam alone.
3D mammography tomosynthesis is an advanced form of mammography that uses low-dose x-rays to form three-dimensional images of the breasts creating more images compared to a traditional mammogram, which is two-dimensional. 3D mammography can help aid in detecting cancer earlier and is a useful tool for patients with dense breast tissue that can otherwise be difficult to view with a regular mammogram. This exam usually takes a few minutes longer and may require an additional fee.
Breast biopsy is when cells are removed from a suspicious area in the breast and then examined to determine whether it is benign or cancerous. An MRI guided breast biopsy is minimally invasive without exposure to radiation and performed by a radiologist with the help of MR images. The radiologist uses the MR images to measure and determine the position of the lesion in order to insert the needle that will remove the suspicious tissue.
Ultrasound guided breast biopsy uses sound waves to locate a breast abnormality for the radiologist to remove. The radiologist will locate the breast lesion by using the ultrasound probe that allows to follow the motion of the needle and insert the needle directly into the suspicious area in order to remove the tissues.
Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography to help a radiologist remove suspicious breast tissue. It is very helpful in evaluating masses that are not visible on ultrasound. The mammography machine uses low-dose x-rays to produce images of the breast and show the exact position of the suspicious area where the radiologist will insert the needle.

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